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## Does Scuba Diving Affect Posterior Vitreous Detachment?

Posterior vitreous detachment (PVD) is a common condition that occurs when the vitreous gel that fills the back of the eye detaches from the retina. This can cause a variety of symptoms, including floaters, flashes of light, and blurred vision. In some cases, PVD can also lead to more serious complications, such as retinal tears or detachment.

## What Causes PVD?

PVD is most commonly caused by aging. As we get older, the vitreous gel becomes thinner and more liquid. This can cause it to detach from the retina, which can lead to PVD. Other factors that can increase the risk of PVD include:

* Nearsightedness
* Diabetes
* Eye injuries
* Cataract surgery

## What Are the Symptoms of PVD?

The most common symptoms of PVD include:

* Floaters
* Flashes of light
* Blurred vision
* Difficulty seeing in dim light
* Seeing a dark curtain or veil over part of your vision

## How Is PVD Diagnosed?

PVD is diagnosed with a dilated eye exam. During this exam, your doctor will use drops to widen your pupils and then examine the back of your eye with a special instrument.

## How Is PVD Treated?

In most cases, PVD does not require treatment. The symptoms usually go away on their own within a few weeks or months. However, if you have severe symptoms, your doctor may recommend surgery to remove the vitreous gel.

## Can Scuba Diving Cause PVD?

There is some evidence that scuba diving can increase the risk of PVD. This is because the pressure changes that occur during diving can cause the vitreous gel to detach from the retina. The risk of PVD is highest in divers who are over the age of 40, who are nearsighted, or who have a history of eye injuries.

## How Can I Reduce the Risk of PVD While Scuba Diving?

There are a few things you can do to reduce the risk of PVD while scuba diving:

* Avoid diving at depths greater than 100 feet.
* Ascend slowly and gradually.
* Take breaks during your dives.
* Stay hydrated.
* Get regular eye exams.

## Conclusion

PVD is a common condition that can occur as a result of aging, other eye conditions, or scuba diving. In most cases, PVD does not require treatment and the symptoms usually go away on their own. However, if you have severe symptoms, your doctor may recommend surgery to remove the vitreous gel.

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