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## Can You Go Scuba Diving with Swimmer’s Ear?

Swimmer’s ear, also known as otitis externa, is a common infection of the ear canal that is caused by bacteria or fungi. It is often caused by exposure to water, such as when swimming, diving, or showering. Symptoms of swimmer’s ear include pain, itching, swelling, and discharge from the ear.

If you have swimmer’s ear, you should avoid scuba diving until the infection has cleared up. Diving with swimmer’s ear can increase the risk of developing a more serious infection, such as a middle ear infection or mastoiditis.

### Why You Shouldn’t Scuba Dive with Swimmer’s Ear

There are several reasons why you shouldn’t scuba dive with swimmer’s ear. First, the increased pressure underwater can put pressure on the eardrum, which can cause pain and further damage. Second, the water in the ear canal can provide a breeding ground for bacteria, which can lead to a more serious infection. Third, the use of scuba diving equipment, such as a mask and snorkel, can further irritate the ear canal.

### How to Treat Swimmer’s Ear

If you have swimmer’s ear, there are several things you can do to treat it:

* **Use over-the-counter ear drops.** There are several over-the-counter ear drops available that can help to treat swimmer’s ear. These ear drops typically contain antibiotics or antifungals to kill the bacteria or fungi that are causing the infection.
* **Apply a warm compress.** Applying a warm compress to your ear can help to reduce pain and swelling.
* **Take pain relievers.** Over-the-counter pain relievers, such as ibuprofen or acetaminophen, can help to relieve pain.
* **See a doctor.** If your swimmer’s ear does not improve after a few days of home treatment, you should see a doctor. The doctor may prescribe antibiotics or antifungals to treat the infection.

Read More  What qualifies as scuba diving

### How to Prevent Swimmer’s Ear

There are several things you can do to prevent swimmer’s ear:

* **Dry your ears thoroughly after swimming or showering.** Use a clean towel to dry your ears thoroughly after swimming or showering.
* **Avoid putting anything in your ears.** Do not put cotton swabs, bobby pins, or other objects in your ears. This can irritate the ear canal and increase the risk of infection.
* **Wear earplugs when swimming.** Wearing earplugs when swimming can help to keep water out of your ears.
* **Use a swim cap.** Wearing a swim cap when swimming can help to keep water out of your ears.
* **See a doctor if you have any symptoms of swimmer’s ear.** If you have any symptoms of swimmer’s ear, such as pain, itching, swelling, or discharge, see a doctor right away.

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