No Widgets found in the Sidebar

## Can You Take Advil Before Scuba Diving?

Ibuprofen, commonly known by the brand name Advil, is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) that is used to relieve pain, fever, and inflammation. It is a popular over-the-counter medication that is used by people of all ages.

However, there is some concern about the use of ibuprofen before scuba diving. This is because ibuprofen can thin the blood, which can increase the risk of decompression sickness (DCS). DCS is a serious condition that can occur when a diver ascends too quickly, causing nitrogen bubbles to form in the blood. These bubbles can block blood vessels and cause damage to the brain, spinal cord, and other organs.

**The risk of DCS is increased in people who:**

* Are overweight or obese
* Have a history of DCS
* Are diving in deep water
* Are diving for a long period of time
* Are ascending too quickly

**Ibuprofen can also increase the risk of other diving-related injuries, such as:**

* Barotrauma: This is a condition that occurs when there is a change in pressure in the middle ear or sinuses. It can cause pain, bleeding, and hearing loss.
* Nitrogen narcosis: This is a condition that occurs when a diver breathes in too much nitrogen at depth. It can cause confusion, disorientation, and loss of consciousness.

**For these reasons, it is generally not recommended to take ibuprofen before scuba diving.** If you must take ibuprofen, be sure to talk to your doctor first. Your doctor can help you weigh the risks and benefits of taking ibuprofen before diving.

**Here are some other things to keep in mind if you are planning to scuba dive:**

* **Stay hydrated.** Drink plenty of fluids before, during, and after your dive.
* **Avoid alcohol.** Alcohol can dehydrate you and increase the risk of DCS.
* **Get a good night’s sleep before your dive.** This will help you stay alert and focused during your dive.
* **Listen to your body.** If you are experiencing any pain, discomfort, or other symptoms, stop diving and seek medical attention.

By following these tips, you can help reduce the risk of DCS and other diving-related injuries.

## What to Do If You Experience DCS

If you experience any symptoms of DCS, such as joint pain, numbness, tingling, or weakness, stop diving and seek medical attention immediately. DCS is a serious condition that can be fatal if not treated promptly.

Treatment for DCS typically involves recompression therapy. This is a process in which the diver is placed in a chamber that is pressurized to a higher level than the depth at which the dive took place. This helps to reduce the size of the nitrogen bubbles and relieve the symptoms of DCS.

## Conclusion

Ibuprofen can increase the risk of DCS and other diving-related injuries. For this reason, it is generally not recommended to take ibuprofen before scuba diving. If you must take ibuprofen, be sure to talk to your doctor first. By following the tips in this article, you can help reduce the risk of DCS and other diving-related injuries.

Read More  What causes vertigo in scuba diving

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *